The administration of parole in Tasmania is characterised by a conservative approach to the granting of parole and a preparedness to use the powers available under the Corrections Act to revoke or suspend parole. Feedback from prisoners and parolees suggests that the Parole Board and the Department of Justice in Tasmania are overly focussed on compliance with the conditions of parole rather than establishing and monitoring reintegration of parolees.

This state of affairs is driven partly by the general disposition of those working in the corrections system to operate over cautiously for fear of political and media fallout, and because the Corrections Act does not focus on reintegration. Proposals for reform of the Act and operation of the Parole Board and how it conducts its processes will be outlined.


Mr Greg Barns

Barrister

Biography: Greg Barns graduated BA LLB from Monash University in 1984. He is currently a PhD Student in the Graduate School of Business and Law and RMIT University. He lectures in Introduction to Law and Jurisprudence in the JD program at RMIT University. Greg is a member of the Tasmanian ,Victorian and Western Australian Bars and practices in the areas of criminal law, administrative law and human rights. He is the founding Chair of the Tasmanian Prisoners Legal Service, which provides advice to prisoners and their families. Greg is a former President of the Australian Lawyers Alliance and currently a spokesman for the Alliance. He writes regularly and comments on criminal justice issues in the media and is the author of 3 books on Australian politics, having worked as a senior political adviser for a decade in the 1990s.


Mr Tony Bull

Former Parolee Tony was born in Hobart and left school when he was 16. Tony grew up in Risdon Vale, a low income area of Hobart, and found himself caught up in the juvenile detention system from the age of 12. He spent a number of years in and out of prison, after first going to jail when he was 17. Tony has extensive experience of the parole system. Despite these set backs Tony enrolled in a social work degree while in prison, which he says gave him the momentum to change his life. Over the past decade Tony has worked on fishing boats, and been a labourer on building sites. He describes himself as jack of all trades.

Biography: Tony was born in Hobart and left school when he was 16. Tony grew up in Risdon Vale, a low income area of Hobart, and found himself caught up in the juvenile detention system from the age of 12. He spent a number of years in and out of prison, after first going to jail when he was 17. Tony has extensive experience of the parole system. Despite these set backs Tony enrolled in a social work degree while in prison, which he says gave him the momentum to change his life. Over the past decade Tony has worked on fishing boats, and been a labourer on building sites. He describes himself as jack of all trades.


Professor Stuart Kinner
University of Melbourne
Professor Professor Stuart Kinner is an NHMRC Senior Research Fellow and leads a program of research focussed on the health of marginalised and justice-involved people. His work is distinguished by methodological rigour, ethical research practice and meaningful research translation. Professor Kinner has produced more than 180 publications including 64 peer-reviewed papers since 2012, and has attracted almost AU$20 million in research and consulting funds, mostly from nationally competitive schemes. He regularly presents at national and international conferences, increasingly by invitation. Professor Kinner co-convenes the Justice Health Special Interest Group in the Public Health Association of Australia, sits on the Board of Directors and Co-Chairs the Research Committee in the NIDA-sponsored Academic Consortium on Criminal Justice Health, Chairs the National Youth Justice Health Advisory Group and since 2005 has served on Australia's National Prisoner Health Information Committee, guiding the evolution of a world-first surveillance system for prisoner and ex-prisoner health.

Biography: Professor Stuart Kinner is an NHMRC Senior Research Fellow and leads a program of research focussed on the health of marginalised and justice-involved people. His work is distinguished by methodological rigour, ethical research practice and meaningful research translation. Professor Kinner has produced more than 180 publications including 64 peer-reviewed papers since 2012, and has attracted almost AU$20 million in research and consulting funds, mostly from nationally competitive schemes. He regularly presents at national and international conferences, increasingly by invitation. Professor Kinner co-convenes the Justice Health Special Interest Group in the Public Health Association of Australia, sits on the Board of Directors and Co-Chairs the Research Committee in the NIDA-sponsored Academic Consortium on Criminal Justice Health, Chairs the National Youth Justice Health Advisory Group and since 2005 has served on Australia's National Prisoner Health Information Committee, guiding the evolution of a world-first surveillance system for prisoner and ex-prisoner health.


Dr Hannah Graham
Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research
Lecturer in Criminology Dr Hannah Graham is a Lecturer in Criminology in the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR) at the University of Stirling, UK.

Her research interests centre on a few areas: punishment and criminal justice, particularly community sanctions and measures and seeking to reduce the use of prison; understanding and supporting rehabilitation, desistance and reintegration processes; and innovation, creativity and justice. Her research in Australia and Scotland has involved spending time in a range of settings: from courts, to probation and community corrections services, private sector electronic monitoring services, prisons, drug rehabs, social enterprises and community sector settings, as well as working with governments and policymakers.

Hannah is the author of three books published internationally by Routledge: ‘Rehabilitation Work: Supporting Desistance and Recovery’ (Graham, 2016), ‘Innovative Justice’ (Graham & White, 2015), and ‘Working with Offenders: A Guide to Concepts and Practices’ (White & Graham, 2010). She is an Editor-in-Chief of the European Journal of Probation (SAGE), together with Ioan Durnescu, Fergus McNeill and Martine Herzog-Evans. From 2006-2014, Hannah worked in the School of Social Sciences at the University of Tasmania, Australia. Twitter: @DrHannahGraham

Biography: Dr Hannah Graham is a Lecturer in Criminology in the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR) at the University of Stirling, UK.

Her research interests centre on a few areas: punishment and criminal justice, particularly community sanctions and measures and seeking to reduce the use of prison; understanding and supporting rehabilitation, desistance and reintegration processes; and innovation, creativity and justice. Her research in Australia and Scotland has involved spending time in a range of settings: from courts, to probation and community corrections services, private sector electronic monitoring services, prisons, drug rehabs, social enterprises and community sector settings, as well as working with governments and policymakers.

Hannah is the author of three books published internationally by Routledge: ‘Rehabilitation Work: Supporting Desistance and Recovery’ (Graham, 2016), ‘Innovative Justice’ (Graham & White, 2015), and ‘Working with Offenders: A Guide to Concepts and Practices’ (White & Graham, 2010). She is an Editor-in-Chief of the European Journal of Probation (SAGE), together with Ioan Durnescu, Fergus McNeill and Martine Herzog-Evans. From 2006-2014, Hannah worked in the School of Social Sciences at the University of Tasmania, Australia. Twitter: @DrHannahGraham


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